Planning system coordinates installation, hookup, startup

A planning system that coordinates the hundreds of tasks involved with install-ation, hookup, and commissioning/ startup of new platforms or upgrades of existing platforms was designed by EDG Inc.

A planning system that coordinates the hundreds of tasks involved with install-ation, hookup, and commissioning/ startup of new platforms or upgrades of existing platforms was designed by EDG Inc. According to EDG, the system "increases hookup crew efficiency, accelerates first oil, reduces shut-in time, enhances safety perfor-mance, and reduces overall project costs."

EDG launched the Work Pax system on an upgrade of BP's Pompano platform in the Gulf of Mexico. The Pompano platform was upgraded for the ExxonMobil Mica subsea tieback and platform de-bottlenecking upgrades. With 160 workers scheduled to be offshore for over 100 days during construction and a 30-day complete shut-in, integrating the ExxonMobil Mica and BP Pompano de-bottlenecking schedules required extensive planning.

The system, EDG said, identified steps, planned, sequenced, and optimized tasks, and personnel required for each task. The goal was to get the facilities to an operational state as quickly as possible. The program currently is in use on BP's TLP Marlin King Field development.

Description

The system divides all offshore tasks into major task groups: structural, mechanical, instrumentation and electrical, and commissioning and start-up. The tasks for each group are assembled into books called Work Pax. Each book contains all material relevant to each task, including drawings, lists of materials and equipment, personnel, estimated man-hours to complete each task, job safety analysis for each task, work permits, and installation procedures. All tasks are rolled into an integrated, resource-loaded, critical path project schedule that shows when each task is scheduled for execution.

Safety gets attention prior to and during construction. Hazards are identified in advance, and counter-measures are developed to reduce risks. As a result, changes in procedures can be made before construction activities to avoid potentially dangerous situations.

Another benefit of such planning is that a new manager, project engineer, or construction superintendent can examine a work document at any time to determine the status of the project and review next steps. Changes in personnel no longer create significant problems. The project moves forward on schedule until the platform is ready to return to service. Progress is tracked daily and matched to the schedule.

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