International E&P report, forecast

It's that time of year again – the Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) is upon us. This month, the annual migration of international industry professionals to Houston will assemble with one goal in mind – survive the week

It's that time of year again – the Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) is upon us. This month, the annual migration of international industry professionals to Houston will assemble with one goal in mind – survive the week. Sure, new tools and technology will be on display at Reliant Center, but let's be honest – it's the parties that draw the masses. It's a social event. Yes, it's a technology conference, too, and we'll be there to cover it (www.offshore-mag.com), but the real challenge is party selection. Good luck. If you've never been before, it's kind of like Mardi Gras for the oilfield. Well, not exactly, but I think you get the idea.

Another annual tradition is our international E&P report. In this issue, the editors highlight the major developments and look ahead in each offshore oil and gas producing region. The forecast segments are supported by data provided by Infield. The series begins onpage 34 with managing editor Bruce Beaubouef's in-depth report on activity in the US Gulf of Mexico.

Malaysia seeking investors

Malaysia intends to position itself as the support hub for Southeast Asia offshore oil and gas operations. Under the direction of the Ministry of Industry and the Malaysia Investment Development Authority (MIDA), the country seeks to draw investment into Malaysia. To help promote its objectives, MIDA invitedEldon Ball, senior editor, technology & economics, to interview Malaysia's oil and gas authorities, associations, and other key stakeholders. Emir Mavani, president and CEO of recently formed Malaysian Petroleum Resources Corp. (MPRC), reveals its plans to transform the oil and gas services industry in Malaysia. Ball's detailed report from his week-long journey across Malaysia begins on page 64.

HRT advancing plans offshore Namibia

The South American and West African southern margin basins are considered to have strong geological similarities. Driven by Brazil's massive presalt discoveries, operators are re-evaluating some analogous areas offshore West Africa that are believed to have significant resource potential. Offshore Namibia, according to Brazilian independent E&P company HRT, is one example. In an exclusive interview forOffshore, Wagner Peres, president of HRT America, discusses in detail the geological similarities of offshore Brazil and West Africa, and the company's plans to exploit the untapped resources off Namibia. Contributing editor Peter Howard Wertheim's interview with Peres begins on page 86.

New technology

Full-field application is imminent for both the industry's first subsea compression and also its first floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) system. Statoil's Åsgard subsea compression system is expected to be the first of its kind when it comes onstream in the first half of 2015.Contributing editor Nick Terdre has the story beginning on page 118. Meanwhile, construction is under way of the world's first offshore FLNG facility for Shell's Prelude project in the Browse basin off northwest Australia. Jeremy Beckman, Editor-Europe, gives an update on the project beginning on page 100.

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