Genesis examines subsea options for UK CO2 storage

The UK’s Oil and Gas Authority has awarded its first carbon dioxide appraisal and storage license as an independent regulator to Pale Blue Dot Energy for the Acorn carbon capture and storage project.

Acorn carbon capture and storage project
Acorn carbon capture and storage project

Offshore staff

LONDON – The UK’s Oil and Gas Authority has awarded its first carbon dioxide (CO2) appraisal and storage license as an independent regulator to Pale Blue Dot Energy for the Acorn carbon capture and storage (CCS) project.

Genesis, the upstream engineering advisory division of TechnipFMC, worked with TechnipFMC Process Technology on screening and feasibility studies for the capture of CO2 at St Fergus on the eastern Scottish coast; the re-use of the subsea Atlantic pipeline; and on technology assessments for natural gas reformation to hydrogen.

Presently Genesis and Pale Blue Dot Energy are defining the CO2 compression and conditioning facilities, and the extension and re-use of existing unused subsea infrastructure, for a European Union Project of Common Interest funded by the Connecting Europe Facility and by the UK and Scottish governments.

The goals of the Acorn program include expanding options to importing CO2 by tanker through Peterhead, north of Aberdeen, and via excess pipeline capacity from the central Scotland’s industrial belt.

Acorn is said to be a low-cost, low-risk CCS project, designed to be built quickly, exploiting oil and gas infrastructure and a well understood offshore CO2 storage site.

The aim is to progress the deployment of large-scale, cost-effective CO2 transport and storage infrastructure in the UK central North Sea.

02/26/2019

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