Host-deployed AUV is potential game changer

Seebyte and Subsea 7 have developed a prototype for a host-deployed AUV for subsea inspection and light intervention, said Jim Jamieson with Subsea 7 in a presentation on Wednesday at the Deep Offshore Technology International Conference in New Orleans.

Offshore staff

NEW ORLEANS -- Seebyte and Subsea 7 have developed a prototype for a host-deployed AUV for subsea inspection and light intervention, said Jim Jamieson with Subsea 7 in a presentation on Wednesday at the Deep Offshore Technology International Conference in New Orleans. "This is a potential game changer," he said.

The development of the Prototype Autonomous Inspection Vehicle (PAIV), supported by BP in the UK and Chevron in the US, into a field operational facility is in the first phase of a three-phase development. Water tank trials were done in 2008 in Aberdeen, Scotland, to simulate hull and riser inspection and observation of areas difficult to access.

The PAIV, measuring 990 mm long, 750 mm wide, and 955 mm tall, is rated to work in up to 1,000 m (upgradable to 2,000 m) water depth for 8-24 hours, Jamieson said. Its maximum propulsion speed is 1.8 knots.

The second phase of the development includes onshore testing and the qualification of projects tasks. Preparation for a project, installation, commissioning, and delivery will be done in phase three.

"The potential of AUV technology probably will exceed our expectations much like the ROV did 20 years ago."

2/4/2009

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