DOT 2011: Controlling Tomorrow's Subsea Technology

As a major oil and gas operating company, Total has developed deepwater fields for more than 10 years.

The following is an abstract of a presentation that will be featured at the Deep Offshore Technology International Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans, Oct. 11-13:

Rory Mackenzie, Total S.A.

As a major oil and gas operating company, Total has developed deepwater fields for more than 10 years. With hundreds of wells in operation and hundreds more being developed, Total is aware of the technological and economical challenges that must be overcome to successfully operate in this arena.
Typical challenges to be addressed include:
• Potential requirement for subsea boosting or flow assurance issues in deeper water
• Economical challenges facing small reservoir development
• Requirement for new subsea architectures to meet increasingly complex fluid systems
• Issues of subsea power transmission and flow assurance in longer tiebacks.

These challenges require new technological solutions such as all electric systems, flowline heating, subsea processing, alternative materials, or subsea autonomous intervention. In preparation for such technology, Total has updated its general specification for subsea control systems on recent projects. These new requirements address the need for increased functionality, greater flexibility, and improved options for obsolescence management.

This paper will overview some key technologies being developed within Total and detail the control system architecture and subsea infrastructure being developed. The paper concludes with a focus on future expansion and the options available to address the unavoidable reality of future component obsolescence. 

This presentation will be featured at the Deep Offshore Technology (DOT) Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans. It is scheduled for 2 p.m., Tuesday Oct. 11, in Suite C Room 15 of the Hilton Riverside.

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