Service vessel demand rising for deepwater work

Offshore service vessels (OSV) are becoming larger, more specialized and more technically sophisticated as a result of the rising demand for more complex deepwater field developments, including the Gulf of Mexico, says Germanischer Lloyd.

Offshore staff

NEW ORLEANS -- Offshore service vessels (OSV) are becoming larger, more specialized and more technically sophisticated as a result of the rising demand for more complex deepwater field developments, including the Gulf of Mexico, says Germanischer Lloyd.

The study further noted that there are about 2,500 OSVs worldwide and that the number is projected to rise from now trough 2020. In addition to upstream oil and gas demand, the call for OSVs will grow to meet the offshore wind industry plans.

All this has led to an expanded definition of OSV which now refers to "not only traditional supply boats, but also anchor handling tug/supply ships, well stimulation ships, and standby ships" and even those "built to carry hazardous and noxious substances, to fight fires, or to occasionally recover oil," explains Stephen Gumpel, area manager North and Central America at GL.

12/09/2010

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