Next generation crane vessel

A monohull heavy-lift vessel has always been a compromise between the required stability during a heavy lift of the maximum capacity, the motion characteristics of the vessel when performing routine lifts during preparation and execution of an installation job or when performing additional duties, such as pipelaying, said Alain Wassink with GustoMSC at the 2008 DOT conference in Houston.

Frank Hartley
Drilling & Production Editor

HOUSTON -- A monohull heavy-lift vessel has always been a compromise between the required stability during a heavy lift of the maximum capacity, the motion characteristics of the vessel when performing routine lifts during preparation and execution of an installation job or when performing additional duties, such as pipelaying, said Alain Wassink with GustoMSC at the 2008 DOT conference in Houston. He continued to say that recent developments have also placed an emphasis on transit speed, which is difficult to achieve with traditional monohull heavy lift vessel designs.

Wassink said to address the compromises an innovative concept has been developed which combines both stability for heavy lifts and good motion characteristics, as well as a high transit speed, in a monohull. He said the resulting vessel design has a maximum lifting capacity exceeding all other monohull heavy lift vessels in operation today by far.

Wassink said it features enhanced motional behavior when performing routine lifting operations at up to 800 [t] and the future possibility of the addition of an S-lay or J-lay pipelay system has been integrated into the design. He added that the vessel is capable of achieving a high transit speed, reducing mobilization time and enabling the vessel to work profitably in remote areas.

02/13/2008

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