Apache's discovery wells off Australia hit milestones

The Julimar Southeast-1 discovery on Australia's Northwest Shelf logged 195 ft (59 m) of net pay across five intervals of the Triassic Mungaroo Sandstone, Apache Corp. says.

Offshore staff

HOUSTON -- The Julimar Southeast-1 discovery on Australia's Northwest Shelf logged 195 ft (59 m) of net pay across five intervals of the Triassic Mungaroo Sandstone, Apache Corp. says.

Apache now has drilled five gas discoveries on license WA-356-P, including Julimar-1, Julimar East-1, Brunello-1, and Brulimar-1.

The latest discovery, which was not tested, was drilled in 502 ft (153 m) of water about 1.9 mi (3.1 km) from Julimar-1, which logged 132 ft (40 m) of net pay and test-flowed a combined 85 MMcf/d (2.4 MMcm/d) from two zones.

"Julimar Southeast-1 encountered both the stratigraphically oldest and structurally deepest gas pay in the field to date," says G. Steven Farris, Apache's president and CEO. "Two additional wells are planned on the block in 2008, and we believe the ultimate size of this gas accumulation could be in the range of 2 to 4 tcf."

Apache owns a 65% interest in the block; Kufpec owns the remaining interest.

Apache also announced that the Halyard-1 discovery test-flowed at a peak rate of 68 MMcf/d (1.9 MMcm/d) of gas and 936 b/d of condensate from 91 ft (28 m) of net gas pay in the Cretaceous Halyard sandstone.

The Halyard-1 discovery was drilled in 366 ft (112 m) of water in WA-13-L, the same production license as the Apache-operated East Spar field. Apache owns a 55% interest in the block, Santos owns the remaining interest. Apache says the discovery is on trend with its John Brookes field, which is producing 240 MMcf/d (6.8 MMcm/d) of gas from three wells.

The test was conducted on 54 ft (16 m) of perforations in two intervals beginning at a measured depth of 8,525 ft (2,598 m). The test was constrained by the capacity of surface equipment.

04/08/2008

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