Ramboll examines options for Norway-Baltic Sea gas link

Ramboll is working on two concept studies for the proposed Baltic Pipe project, which would open a new supply corridor for the European gas market.

Offshore staff

COPENHAGEN, DenmarkRamboll is working on two concept studies for the proposed Baltic Pipe project, which would open a new supply corridor for the European gas market.

After completing a feasibility study at the end of last year and the EPII terminal feasibility study this February, Ramboll will continue as technical advisor for the project, performing one conceptual study for the EPII gas receiving terminal at Nybro, Denmark, and one for the subsea pipeline connecting the Danish and Polish transmission systems in the Baltic Sea.

The Nybro study concerns a tie-in to the Norwegian transmission system. It involves examining results from the completed feasibility study, further defining details of the reception terminal, and preparing documentation to obtain a firm project schedule, cost estimate, and basis for the forthcoming detailed engineering phase.

The subsea pipeline study will examine pipeline route selection, quantitative risk assessment and mechanical design, crossing identification, and agreements and preparation of survey specifications.

Baltic Pipe is said to be one of the European Union’s projects of common interest, aimed at strengthening the European internal energy market.

“Establishing the viability of the project is a significant step towards a common goal of providing affordable, secure, and sustainable reliable energy among the citizens of the Nordic and Central Eastern European community,” said Sofie Leweson, Project Manager, Energinet.

By 2022, up to 10 bcm/yr of gas could be flowing from the Norwegian trunkline system toDenmark, Poland, and on to Eastern Europe.

Recently, Ramboll also won a new two-year framework agreement from theNorwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) for consultancy services related to technology, risks, plans, and costs.

This is part of NPD’s plans to develop new fields and improve recovery from producing fields.

The scope of work covers evaluation of development concepts; production facilities, processing and water treatment; maintenance, operation and late phase production; flexibility for handling contingency, uncertainties and connections to third parties; power generation, electrification, air pollution and environment; and infrastructure solutions for oil, gas, and LNG.

07/06/2017

More in Pipelines