Pipelines could be converted for CO2 transport

A study is under way into the suitability of sandstones beneath the Moray Firth, 30 mi (48 km) offshore northeast Scotland, for storing emitted carbon dioxide (CO2).

Offshore staff

EDINBURGH, UK -- A study is under way into the suitability of sandstones beneath the Moray Firth, 30 mi (48 km) offshore northeast Scotland, for storing emitted carbon dioxide (CO2).

The Scottish government, utilities, and companies including Shell, BG Group, and Schlumberger are funding the £300,000 ($439,000) program.

The Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage (SCCS) will evaluate the Captain sandstone for its technical and commercial viability as a CO2 store as part of the UK’s long-term plan to reduce carbon emissions.

The targeted rock is over half a mile subsurface. According to SCCS, it is one of numerous sandstones filled with saltwater that provide more than 95% of potential CO2storage capacity in the northern part of the UK North Sea.

Geological mapping and modeling of the Captain sandstone will appraise the thickness, extent, and fluid flow properties of the rock. The study also will address issues associated with CO2 injection and monitoring.

The team will implement computer modeling of CO2 injection into the rocks to assess the site’s long-term performance. As for transporting CO2 emitted from industrial sources to the offshore region, existing natural gas pipelines could be employed or new lines constructed. This could lead to the formation of a CO2 pipeline network.

All research should be completed this year.

06/02/2010

More in Pipelines