Nord Stream cleared for German transit route

Germany has issued approvals for its section of the offshore route for the Nordstream gas trunkline from northern Russia.

Offshore staff

ZUG, Switzerland -- Germany has issued approvals for its section of the offshore route for the Nordstream gas trunkline from northern Russia.

Last week the Stralsund Mining Authority issued a construction permit covering a 50-km (31-mi) offshore section of the 1,223-km (760-mi) pipeline with landfall in Lubmin near Greifswald. The award follows a three-year process of environmental impact assessments and discussions with the government of the province of Mecklenburg-West-Pomerania and other stakeholders.

The permit for the 31-km (19-mi) offshore section through Germany’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) was awarded yesterday by the Federal Maritime and Hydrographical Agency. To date, the Nord Stream consortium has been cleared to take the line through territorial waters off Denmark, Sweden and Russia, and a further section through the Finnish EEZ Only a further permit from the Finnish authorities is now outstanding.

Nord Stream’s Managing Director Matthias Warnig said: “We are firmly on schedule to start construction of the pipeline in spring 2010 and to start transporting gas in 2011.”

Construction is due to be completed in 2012. The Nord Stream trunkline will be able to transport 55 bcm/yr of gas a year from Russia to Germany, where it will be connected to the European energy grid. Gazprom has so far signed long-term contracts to supply gas through the trunkline to countries including Germany, Denmark, The Netherlands, Belgium, France, and The United Kingdom.

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