MEG flow meters head to Ichthys

Litre Meter has dispatched 45 positive displacement flow meters to the Ichthys LNG project in the Browse basin off Western Australia via the company’s South Korean distributor S-TEK.

May 22nd, 2015

Offshore staff

NORTH MARSTON, UKLitre Meter has dispatched 45 positive displacement flow meters to the Ichthys LNG project in the Browse basin off Western Australia via the company’s South Korean distributor S-TEK.

For this order the manufacturer produced three different sizes of meter, V125, HF40, and HF60 for a chemical injection skid under construction in South Korea.

The V125 meter, designed to measure the discharge of monoethylene glycol (MEG) at the wellhead pump, was constructed from duplex with a PVD-coated SS nitronic rotor with a 2-in. ANSI 2500 RTJ connection and pressure rated to 414 bar (6,004 psi).

The HF40 PD meter is rated to a similar pressure and shares the same connections. The HF60 flow meter is pressure rated to 690 bar (10,007 psi) and features 2-in. GR14 connections.

All the meters can operate in a temperature range of -40 and +150°C (-40 to +302°F) and can be used with fluids in viscosities ranging from 0.8 to 2,000 centistokes or greater.

Normal flow range of the V125 is 0-6,000 l/h, while the HF40 has a flow range of 0-2,400 l/h and the HF60 0-3,600 l/h.

Under conditions of low temperature and high pressure, gas hydrates can solidify as crystals which may block pipelines and valves, impeding the transfer of oil and gas. This could result in a shutdown and the risk of explosion or unintended release of hydrocarbons.

MEG is injected at high pressure where there is a risk of hydrates (dew) forming then freezing at low temperature. Litre Meter VFF positive displacement flow meters measure the correct amount of MEG needed to prevent hydrate formation.

The process, known as bullheading, pumps MEG into the borehole to act as an “antifreeze” to lower the freezing point of gas hydrate. This protects the wells’ subsurface valves from hydrates forming under high pressure and low temperatures during long shutdowns.

05/22/2015

More in Pipelines