Shuttle tankers still a GoM option

ConocoPhillips opted for pipelines to carry oil to shore from its Magnolia platform in Garden Banks block 783 in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, but said it considers FPSOs and shuttle tankers an option for its future Gulf developments.

ConocoPhillips opted for pipelines to carry oil to shore from its Magnolia platform in Garden Banks block 783 in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, but said it considers FPSOs and shuttle tankers an option for its future Gulf developments.
In a Houston presentation Nov. 19 to the Society of Professional Engineers, ConocoPhillips Deepwater Development Manager Glenn Schaaf and Seahorse Shuttle and Technology Commercial Manager Matthew Pritchard discussed the decision to use pipelines rather than shuttle tankers to carry oil from the Magnolia development in 4,700 ft of water. The operator contemplated using several methods of development, including an FPSO, still under review by the US Minerals Management Services at the time. The pipeline won out in this development, sanctioned in December 2001, mainly because of time and timing. The company wanted to stick to its goal of first oil by 2004, so it sanctioned the TLP project around the time the MMS said it would accept development applications featuring use of an FPSO. Shell stepped up to the challenge of running the first pipeline into this section of the GoM at record deepwater depths, and the company believes the pipeline will be complete in time to meet the previously scheduled first oil goal. Magnolia is 50 mi away from current GoM pipeline infrastructure.
"An awful lot of our acreage is a lot further from infrastructure than Magnolia is," Schaaf said. "(Shuttle tankers) didn't work for Magnolia, but we believe we'll be back to shuttling for other developments." Schaaf continued. "We strongly believe that shuttling will be a long-term development answer in the Gulf of Mexico."
11/19/02

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