Sub-surface scanner to probe Middle East fields

Adrok Group has signed a deal with Oman-based International Business Development Company LLC (IBD) to deploy its sub-surface imaging technology in the Middle East.

Offshore staff


EDINBURGH -- Adrok Group has signed a deal with Oman-based International Business Development Company LLC (IBD) to deploy its sub-surface imaging technology in the Middle East.

The company’s Atomic Dielectric Resonance (ADR) scanner can be used to identify and image any substance down to molecular or atomic level. Adrom claims that the technique allows exploration companies/operators to pinpoint the location of hydrocarbons before starting drilling programs.

ADR can also be used to quantify oil or gas reserves, provide insight into sub-surface sand/water mix, map geological structures to a higher resolution, or to perform scans of large remote areas. Oil and gas companies can use these data to help develop new reserves, or to monitor their producing fields.

Tests with the equipment have been conducted in offshore locations, deep-lying volcanic sites onshore Scotland’s, in the Canadian arctic region, and in the deserts of Oman. The system is currently being used mainly during onshore exploration, but with some activity also offshore. Under the new agreement, Adrok’s technology will be licensed to IBD which will provide the ADR scanner directly to oil and gas companies in the Middle East.

According to Adrok, the technology determined how different substances – including hydrocarbons – interact with light waves passing through them, which are then reflected back to the surface. Unlike alternative technologies, the ADR scanned does not rely on interpretation or probability. The system measures the resonance of the rock and how it reflects the light wave. It can also be used to determine how different types of rock interact with the wave.

IBD Group’s CEO, Sayyid Mohammed Al-Said, says: “This technology has the potential to change the way oil and gas companies conduct business, not only in new exploration but also in finding the oil or gas that was left behind in old fields. I believe the technology will significantly contribute to reducing oil or gas extraction cost which would translate into savings in overall cost to the end user. We are excited that this partnership will bring the technology to the Middle East”

4/8/2010

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