Middle East research program in carbonate reservoirs begins

A joint research collaboration has been launched that will focus on further understanding carbonate reservoirs, which constitute the vast majority of hydrocarbon reservoirs across the Middle East, and CO2 storage.

Offshore staff

DOHA, Qatar -- A joint research collaboration has been launched that will focus on further understanding carbonate reservoirs, which constitute the vast majority of hydrocarbon reservoirs across the Middle East, and CO2 storage. This collaboration involves select academic partners from around the world, the first being Imperial College London.

Funded jointly by Qatar Petroleum, the Qatar Science & Technology Park, and Shell, who will contribute together up to $70 million over a 10-year period, this collaboration aims to provide the foundation for new CO2 storage technologies that can be applied in Qatar, elsewhere in the Middle East, and beyond, according to research partner Imperial College London.

The college says researchers will characterize carbonate reservoirs in detail and develop advanced computer modeling and simulations to establish an in-depth knowledge of rock structures and the way fluids like oil, water, and natural gas and CO2 move within them. This in turn will improve understanding of how these rocks trap gas and fluids.

With this knowledge, researchers will be able to propose new CO2 management plans and processes, and identify suitable carbonate rock formations to potentially store CO2 emitted from power stations, oil refineries and other manufacturing plants, the college says.

06/09/2008

More in Geosciences