Field complexity creates Kristin questions

Kristin field in the Norwegian Sea is proving to be more complicated than originally thought, which could delay its production schedule. Operator Statoil and its partners are seeking alternative methods for draining the reservoir.

Kristin field in the Norwegian Sea is proving to be more complicated than originally thought, which could delay its production schedule. Operator Statoil and its partners are seeking alternative methods for draining the reservoir.

The complex reservoir has required continuous discussion between the partners on the appropriate drainage solution. Longer, more horizontal, but more expensive wells are seen as one solution. The new drainage strategy is expected to boost condensate recovery and raise revenues.

Kristin could face a total cost increase of NOK1-2 billion if a modified drainage approach is approved. The new drainage strategy will be resolved during March.

"Work on the actual platform is well on schedule, and it will be delivered and installed as planned," reports Nina Udnes Tronstad, operations vice president for Kristin.

The riser balcony and living quarters were built in Spain and Sweden, respectively. They are due to be transported to the Aker Stord yard south of Bergen later in February. The modules will be hooked up during March. Aker Stord is currently building the process and utility modules for the platform.

Statoil will transfer 100,000-200,000 working hours from riser balcony fabricator Dragados to Aker Stord to maintain the original installation plan at Stord.

According to Tronstad, the most complex aspects of the Kristin development are the subsea systems and the reservoir. The subsea systems involve new technology, and the seabed installations are demanding. Also, the fabrication schedule is tight.

Kristin's cost estimate for its development and operation is NOK 17.1 billion. The field is scheduled to start producing gas on Oct. 1, 2005.

(02/09/04)

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