MMS commissions Proserv for decommissioning study

Minerals Management Service has commissioned Proserv Offshore to study the technical issues and methodology for decommissioning fixed structures in water depths greater than 400 ft (122 m) and floating structures in water depths of more than 9,842 ft (3,000 m) in the Gulf of Mexico.

Offshore staff

HOUSTON -- Minerals Management Service has commissioned Proserv Offshore to study the technical issues and methodology for decommissioning fixed structures in water depths greater than 400 ft (122 m) and floating structures in water depths of more than 9,842 ft (3,000 m) in the Gulf of Mexico.

Proserv says this project breaks new ground, as it includes fixed structures, deepwater and ultra deepwater floating facilities such as spars, TLPs, and semisubmersibles, plus well P&A costs and the decommissioning of all subsea systems.

The primary objective of the study is to give MMS a greater understanding of the technical issues associated with removing these types of facilities, and the likely costs each option would pose, Proserv says.

The industry’s current methodology, technology, and experience have been limited to decommissioning of fixed platforms, pipelines, and wells in GoM water depths approximating 400 ft (122 m), according to Proserv.

The study is scheduled for completion later this year. The MMS will publish portions of the study once it is completed.

This study follows a similar project completed for the MMS in 2002 when Proserv developed a methodology and cost for the decommissioning of the large platforms in the US Pacific OCS Region (California).

Meanwhile, Proserv’s Subsea & Marine Technology business unit is marketing its new, 180-in. (457-cm) water-abrasive cutting tool. In one case study in the South Timbalier area, Proserv says it completed 16 cuts in three-and-a-half days, ranging from 36-in. (91-cm) main piles requiring topside deployment to 48-in. (122-cm) skirt piles requiring subsea deployment. In the Vermilion area, the company completed a three-day project that included cutting four 60-in. (152-cm) and four 48-in. main piles, and four 48-in. skirt piles.

Proserv’s JetCut system uses water-abrasive technology to directly inject cutting material into the water stream.

6/17/2009

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