Tideland lights up reactivated Saleh platforms

RAK Petroleum has chosen Tideland Signals’ Syncrolan light and fog warning systems for its Saleh field platforms offshore Ras Al Khaimah, UAE.

Offshore staff

BURGESS HILL, UK – RAK Petroleum has chosen Tideland Signals’ Syncrolan light and fog warning systems for its Saleh field platforms offshore Ras Al Khaimah, UAE.

Since 1988, Saleh's five platforms have only produced small volumes of gas and condensate. However, RAK as new operator plans to redevelop the field, initially by deepening an existing well.

To alert shipping in the area, both the Saleh 1 and Saleh 5 platforms are marked by four Tideland Syncrolan LED light stations, fog signal, fog detector and, Informer AIS AtoN. The latter relays AIS message 21 to vessels in the vicinity identifying itself as an offshore structure.

On Saleh-1 the light stations combine an MLED-300 LED main light with a range of 10 NM and a 3 NM MLED-155 red subsidiary light equipped with a 24V charger, which provides 96 hours back-up for the main and secondary lights. There is a similar arrangement on Saleh 5 platform, except that the charger only provides back-up for the main light in the event of the main power supply failing.

The Syncrolan units on Saleh 1 are wired to an Exd monitoring/switching enclosure that provides a fail alarm to an existing central monitoring panel, while the systems on Saleh 5 operate as standalone units. The light stations are ATEX certified for use in Zone 2 hazardous areas and UL listed for Class 1 Div 2 Grp D.

Fog signal stations each comprise an AB-560 fog signal mounted on a galvanized steel frame, also incorporating an ECU 645 control unit. The AB-560’s five driver-emitters that give a usual range of two nautical miles, audible through 360 degrees, although any driver in the array will produce a sound signal in excess of the required standby range of half a nautical mile.

The stations are also equipped with an optional visibility sensor that automatically switches on the fog signal whenever visibility dips below 3,700 m (2Nm).

10/18/2011

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