NOIA Chairman: Strengthening a partnership

To stay on top of developments in the White House, in the Congress, in the executive agencies, and to be a part of the national dialogue in the news media, would require a company to make a heavy commitment of time, talent and money. And even then, the job would be only half done,because knowing what's happening in Washington is not the same as knowing what to do about it. That's why offshore companies working together under the NOIA umbrella can accomplish what no company can do alone.

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To stay on top of developments in the White House, in the Congress, in the executive agencies, and to be a part of the national dialogue in the news media, would require a company to make a heavy commitment of time, talent and money.

And even then, the job would be only half done,because knowing what's happening in Washington is not the same as knowing what to do about it. That's why offshore companies working together under the NOIA umbrella can accomplish what no company can do alone.

NOIA is the only national trade association that represents the interests of all segments of the offshore and related industries. Since its inception in 1972, NOIA's membership has grown to include some 270 variously sized companies located nationwide. The specialties and expertise of NOIA member companies are varied and range from petroleum production, drilling, equipment manufacture and supply, diving and offshore construction to engineering, finance and insurance, marine and air transport and research and technology.

NOIA's mission

NOIA's mission, which focuses on two core areas - gaining greater access to the outer continental shelf and improving the economic climate for NOIA members to do business in the US - has challenged us with both difficult and ambitious objectives.

But when you consider the technology evolution taking place, the uncertainty of oil and natural gas prices, the constantly changing economic, political and regulatory scene in the United States, and the emerging public relations trends that are becoming increasingly more important to corporate business strategies, these are challenges that will be with us in the new millennium, and they demand nothing less.

While history will judge our long-term success, 1996 was a year in which meaningful progress was made by the offshore industries to shape its own future. Some in the industry, including myself, might even view 1996 as the year in which we, as an association and as an industry, came of age.

Preparing for the future

To achieve our vision for the future, we recognized and proceeded to take the necessary steps by presenting ourselves as a committed and unified organization and industry to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing environment.

This is largely due to the progressive spirit we encountered one year ago when the offshore industry was successful in its passage of the Deep Water Royalty Relief Act, one of the most significant and climactic legislative victories in the history of the offshore industry.

Over the succeeding months, we experienced the same dynamic commitment within the NOIA membership to have the association become a more assertive and active trade association on Capitol Hill.

In 1996, this was carried out through accomplishments that will prove extremely valuable for the offshore industries in the years ahead. Such notable gains include the passage of the legislation in late September containing NOIA-backed amendments to the Oil Pollution Act. The amendments resolve industry concerns regarding implementation of the act's offshore facility requirements and the ability of OCS operators to find and afford liability coverage.

OCS access

NOIA also established an industry coalition to look at a strategy for increasing OCS access in the next five-year leasing plan. An outgrowth of the strategy is the energy awareness effort now underway.

In a long awaited and most welcome announcement, the EPA finally issued a clarification on the regulatory treatment of synthetic-based drilling fluids. NOIA's efforts helped bring to a close a three-year deliberation on the effective use of this new technology and its application to offshore operations.

In 1996, NOIA also achieved a 10-year record high in membership development. With more than 30 new members joining the association in 1996, and numerous members voluntarily increasing their dues, NOIA has enjoyed a membership revenue increase of more than $140,000.

On the pages that follow, you'll read about the confident and creative spirit that characterized NOIA's work over the past year. Also, you will read about the association's abilities and integrity, its organizational structure that values results, determination, resourcefulness and intelligent risk taking to help industry achieve its vision for the future.

NOIA welcomes opportunities to strengthen its partnership with the offshore industries. As the association rolls up its sleeves to meet the challenges of 1997, I am confident NOIA will meet with success, because we have the unity, determination and support of our members needed to succeed in NOIA's 25th year of service to the offshore industries.

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Robert E. Rose
Chairman, NOIA
President and Chief Executive Officer
Diamond Offshore Drilling, Inc.


Copyright 1997 Oil & Gas Journal. All Rights Reserved.

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