OGTC provides further funding for subsea liquid removal technique

Worley’s INTECSEA consultancy has funding from the Oil & Gas Technology Centre for prototype testing of its Pseudo Dry Gas liquid removal system.

May 11th, 2019
Pseudo Dry Gas liquid removal system
Pseudo Dry Gas liquid removal system

Offshore staff

ABERDEEN, UK – Worley’s INTECSEA consultancy has funding from the Oil & Gas Technology Centre (OGTC) for prototype testing of its Pseudo Dry Gas (PDG) liquid removal system.

The technology is designed to make more long-distance subsea tiebacks commercially viable. By reducing back pressure in the pipeline, PDG is said to eliminate the need for topsides and costly compression.

Current prototype testing is based on a techno-economic concept study completed in March, also funded through the OGTC.

The study suggested the system could provide an additional $10 billion in revenue over alternatives for application in a known stranded gas basin, north of the Shetland Islands.

It also showed that PDG could reduce upstream carbon dioxide by 65-80%, significantly restricting the environmental footprint.

An additional application studied under the original OGTC scope was gas disposal for small oil pool developments. Results are said to indicate a stand-alone economic case with further benefits for normally unmanned offshore facilities, due to the removal of high maintenance topside gas processing equipment.

A 6-in. scaled prototype of the liquid removal unit will be tested over a six-month period at Cranfield University’s flow loop facilities north of London.

It will simulate flow conditions typically encountered in a gas / gas condensate subsea tieback system to demonstrate the liquid removal efficiencies.

Lee Thomas, INTECSEA’s engineering lead for PDG technology, said: “The solution is elegantly simple; it uses multiple passive liquid removal units and a liquid disposal pipeline connected to proven standardized pumps.”

Graeme Rogerson, marginal developments project manager for the OGTC, added: “There are over 360 marginal developments in the UK continental shelf, [each] with approximately 3-50 MMbbl of untapped oil and gas…

“The search will soon begin for an operator willing to undertake a pilot project of an integrated unit. An ideal pilot would be maintaining gas production from an existing tieback post-water breakthrough in a mono ethylene glycol-constrained environment.

“This would create a significant value impact, with a minimal downside. Given the range of applications for this technology across a broad spectrum and the positive underlying economics, the project team is hopeful an operator will step forward.”

05/10/2019

More in Subsea