ASME designates the two-cone drill bit as a Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) is designating the Hughes Christensen Two-Cone Drill Bit as a Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark.

Offshore staff

HOUSTON, Texas -- The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) is designating the Hughes Christensen Two-Cone Drill Bit as a Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark. The award recognizes this drilling technology as one of the nation’s most important mechanical engineering achievements, according to Baker Hughes.

Prior to 1909, the traditional fishtail bit scraped the rock and quickly dulled in service. The Hughes two-cone bit’s revolutionary rolling action crushed hard-rock formations, allowing drillers to tap vast oil reservoirs deep below the surface. In 1933, Hughes Tool Co. enhanced the two-cone bit concept with the Tricone three-cone drill bit. In 1987, Hughes Tool Co. merged with Baker International to form Baker Hughes Inc.

The ASME History and Heritage Landmarks Program began in 1971. The History and Heritage Committee provides a public service by examining, noting, recording and acknowledging particularly significant mechanical engineering achievements. The History and Heritage Program has designated nearly 250 landmarks as historic mechanical engineering landmarks, heritage collections or heritage sites. Each represents a progressive step in the evolution of mechanical engineering and its significance to society. Past designees include the US standard screw threads, Drake oil well, Wright Flyer III, Ford Model-T, Sikorsky VS-300 helicopter, Howard Hughes flying boat, Saturn V rocket, and the Hughes Glomar Explorer.

07/23/2009

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